Crito by plato socrates argument

He is visited before dawn by his old friend Crito, who has made arrangements to smuggle Socrates out of prison to the safety of exile. Socrates seems quite willing to await his imminent execution, and so Crito presents as many arguments as he can in order to persuade Socrates to escape. Also, Socrates should not worry about the risk or the financial cost to his friends; these they are willing to pay, and they have also arranged to find Socrates a pleasant life in exile. On a more ethical level, Crito presents two more pressing arguments:

Crito by plato socrates argument

Summary[ edit ] The dialogue takes place in Socrates' prison cell, where he awaits execution. He is visited before dawn by his old friend Crito, who has made arrangements to smuggle Socrates out of prison to the safety of exile.

Socrates seems quite willing to await his imminent execution, and so Crito presents as many arguments as he can in order to persuade Socrates to escape. On a practical level, Socrates' death will reflect badly on his friends--people will think they did nothing to try to save him.

Also, Socrates should Crito by plato socrates argument worry about the risk or the financial cost to his friends; these they are willing to pay, and they have also arranged to find Socrates a pleasant life in exile.

On a more ethical level, Crito presents two more pressing arguments: Socrates answers first that one should not worry about public opinion, but only listen to wise and expert advice.

What Socrates Taught (Part 2) by Sanderson Beck

Crito should not worry about how his, Socrates', or others' reputations may fare in the general esteem: The only question at hand is whether or not it would be just for Socrates to attempt an escape.

If it is just, he will go with Crito, if it is unjust, he must remain in prison and face death. At this point, Socrates introduces the voice of the Laws of Athens, which speaks to him and proceeds to explain why it would be unjust for him to leave his cell.

Since the Laws exist as one entity, to break one would be to break them all, and in doing so, Socrates would cause them great harm.

The citizen is bound to the Laws like a child is bound to a parent, and so to go against the Laws would be like striking a parent. Rather than simply break the Laws and escape, Socrates should try to persuade the Laws to let him go. These Laws present the citizen's duty to them in the form of a kind of social contract.

By choosing to live in Athens, a citizen is implicitly endorsing the Laws, and is willing to abide by them. Socrates, more than most, should be in accord with this contract, as he has lived a happy seventy years fully content with the Athenian way of life. If Socrates were to break from prison now, having so consistently validated the social contract, he would be making himself an outlaw who would not be welcome in any other civilized state for the rest of his life.

Crito - Wikipedia

And when he dies, he will be harshly judged in the underworld for behaving unjustly toward his city's laws. Thus, Socrates convinces Crito that it would be better not to attempt an escape. Crito's argument to Socrates[ edit ] The dialogue begins with Socrates waking up to the presence of Crito in his prison cell and inquiring whether it is early in the day.

Crito explains that he admires the peaceful manner in which Socrates has heretofore lived and the level of calm that Socrates displays in the face of death. Socrates replies that it is only fitting that he react in such a manner given his age, and expresses surprise that the guard has let Crito into his cell at such an early hour.

Crito informs Socrates that he is well-acquainted with the guard and has done him a certain benefaction. Crito relays bad news to Socrates.

He tells him that there are eyewitness reports that the ship has come in from Delosand that tomorrow Socrates will be executed. Socrates rebuffs the report, saying he has had a dream—a vision of a woman in a white cloak telling him that on the third day hence he will go to Phthiawhich is a reference to Achilles ' threat in the Iliad that he—the mightiest of Greek warriors—might just leave for his home in "fertile" Phthia and be there in "just three days" if the Greeks fail to show him due respect.

Socrates says that the meaning of this is perfectly clear - it will be three days until he dies. Crito does not allow Socrates to elaborate the meaning of the dream, but only calls him daimonic ; Crito has arrived at this early hour to save Socrates from death.

Crito tells Socrates that if he follows through with the execution, people will assume that Crito and friends were too cheap to finance an escape.

Crito insists that he will not get into much trouble as a result of having helped Socrates escape, for those who would inform against him are cheaply bought. Moreover, Crito urges, Socrates has support in other cities, including Thessalyand to be exiled would not be entirely negative.

Crito continues with moral appeals.

Crito by plato socrates argument

He says that Socrates would be unjustly joining the efforts of his enemies against him. He is choosing the "easiest path" as opposed to the courageous, honorable, and virtuous path, which Crito feels is to flee from certain, unjust death.Analysis of Plato's Crito.

The life of Socrates provides one example of a someone who seeks a justification for his or her moral actions. Socrates tries to use REASON (rather than the values embedded in his culture) to determine whether an action is right or wrong.

Lecture 8 Greek Thought: Socrates, Plato and Aristotle: The political and social upheaval caused by the Persian Wars as well as continued strife between Athens and Sparta (see Lecture 7) had at least one unintended benjaminpohle.com the 5 th century, a flood of new ideas poured into Athens.

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In general, these new ideas came as a result of an influx of Ionian thinkers into the Attic peninsula. And note also how Crito's own opinion changed during the course of the argument. What consequences might this have for "dialogues" concerning right and wrong?

In the Phaedo, Plato tells of a last dialogue by Socrates. Analysis of Plato's Crito. The life of Socrates provides one example of a someone who seeks a justification for his or her moral actions.

Socrates tries to use REASON (rather than the values embedded in his culture) to determine whether an action is right or wrong. After undermining Crito’s appeal to the opinion of the many, Socrates starts the central argument of the dialogue. Socrates emphasizes that what follows might not be acceptable to the many – this claim explains in retrospective the importance of arguing against the relevance/importance of the majority’s opinion.

Crito By Plato. Commentary: Many comments have been posted about Crito. By Plato Written B.C.E Translated by Benjamin Jowett. Persons of the Dialogue SOCRATES CRITO Scene The Prison of Socrates. Socrates. WHY have you come at this hour, Crito? it must be That argument, which, as I believe, is maintained by many who assume to be.

Crito by plato socrates argument
Analysis of the Crito